Last week, I mentioned that I’m not a lifelong fiction writer nor poet, having started in 2010. However, I had kept a non-fiction blog for some years before this.

Although WordPress was around in 2003, the most popular blog host at the time was LiveJournal, known among its users as LJ. My first entry was on 19 December of that year, when I was studying at what is now the University of the West of Scotland, although my profile has – for some reason – always said my account was created on 15 March 2004.

I was reminded of my these days though my pal Katy Jones, who not only joined a year or two before me, but still uses it. She was interviewed for a podcast recently, in which she spoke about the appeal of LJ compared to other sites.

However, we’d actually become acquainted through a media forum, entirely separate from LJ, as we were active in different hospital radio stations around the same time. In fact, we’ve never met and I don’t think we’ve spoken by phone or video chat, yet Katy remains one of my most enduring online friendships. We might even be starting pen-pal correspondence soon.

So what of my old LJ account? It still exists, and it served as a good sandbox in which to practice for this WordPress blog, which began in 2013. At that time, the paid-for features of LJ matched the free features of WordPress, so it was an obvious choice to switch for me.

By this time, I’d more or less established my current style, as seen in an alliterative LJ entry from 2013 documenting my transition. My last detailed entry there was a look-back in December 2015. There are earlier entries that still stand up to reasonable scrutiny, like this entry from May 2004.

But there were also duds along the way, like this one that’s disjointed and uninteresting, asking a question about football and then rambling about Firefox and the bit-rates of MP3 files. Years later, we see a desperate attempt to keep the LJ page alive with tedious #MusicMonday entries.

So one thing I’ve learnt over the years is to look at my entries from outside of my own head. If a topic only makes sense to me, then there’s no point in making it public.

Judging by the reactions and the viewing statistics I receive from this WordPress page, I do manage to engage people. I can even look back at entries from six years ago and still be satisfied with them, other than spotting an occasional sentence that needs rephrasing.

I do hope I’ll be able to read this in May 2026 and feel the same way.

2 thoughts on “A Living Document

  1. You’ve certainly made lots of memories on LJ as well as WordPress and they’re fun to catalogue over so many of life’s twists and turns.

    Oh yes you’re right that we met at the media website originally over Hospital Radio. I almost forgot that lol. It’s been like that with a couple of other friends too on LJ. I met them elsewhere but we became LJ friends quickly so it was easy to forget that we didn’t meet on LJ itself so to speak. You’re right, we’ve never interacted over voice directly but you’ve sent me sound clips at my LJ parties I think over the years and you’ve listened to my shows and so on. And yes, penpals now through the mail to keep in touch away from LJ. I’ll write soon.

    I’m just so happy that I found this old username on here so maybe I’ll use WP more generally lol. I’m happy it WORKS too as my other username didn’t. Maybe the WP spam catcher was making my comments disappear.

    Anyway, great post. It was a lovely read.

    Like

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