News in brief.

I’m afraid last week’s entry was rather short, and so is this one.

For the first time in six years, I’ve been unable to complete the 50,000 words required for a NaNoWriMo novel. It’s not that I’m stuck with the story – far from it, in fact – but I have to write a detailed essay about Paradise Lost by John Milton for my MLitt degree, and it’s due for this Friday.

Happily, the essay is now under control and I should be able to submit it a day or two before the deadline. After that, I’ll aim to resume my usual long entries.

Bang for your buck.

I realised recently that I hadn’t sent off any work to publishers for rather a while, and now I’m beginning to make up for it.

When you submit short stories or poetry on a regular basis, you quickly realise there are two broad types of market.

  1. Directly to publishers. This is where an publishing house invites submissions of single poems or stories for an anthology, often on a set theme, and an editor decides what’s included. There are usually no charge to send in work and the author is often paid a flat fee or a rate per printed word.
  2. Competitions. This is where an organisation invites submissions, often on a set theme, and a judge or panel of judges decide who wins. There is often a charge to send in work, and the winner usually receives a cash prize along with publication.
English: Wil Wheaton at the 2011 Phoenix Comic...
English: Wil Wheaton at the 2011 Phoenix Comicon in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At least that’s how it should work. However, I’ve been involved in more discussion of late about places that aren’t giving a fair deal to their contributors. This includes Star Trek actor Wil Wheaton, who was asked to write for the Huffington Post in return for ‘exposure’.

I’ve heard anecdotal evidence from a couple of poet friends that a popular magazine follows a similar ‘exposure’ model with the claim that they’re a small press and are unable to pay. At least one of these friends has been professionally published elsewhere and will no longer submit to this magazine.

I’ve also recently spotted an advert for a competition with a £10 entry fee or £11 if submitting online, and the prize is to read your work at their event. To me, there’s a lot wrong with this.

Firstly, the price difference is not explained; contributors appear to be penalised for not wasting paper. Secondly, it’s still around double what you would expect to pay to enter a competition. Thirdly, there’s not so much as a nominal cash prize offered, nor any mention of a contributor’s copy.

My advice is to be clear about your reason for sending your work to a particular place. Ask yourself whether the reward is proportionate to its quality and to the financial position of the publisher.

That principle still applies to charity or fundraising work. This year, for instance, I’ve been invited to perform at local landmarks to raise funds for the maintenance and restoration. As I know the organisers, I’m clear that I’m donating my time and work to these causes. One of them even offered me travel expenses, which I declined.

But don’t think everywhere is out to get you. Gutter magazine offers a two-year subscription rather than cash payment, which I consider to be fair, while feminist zine Artificial Womb is a tiny operation but makes a point of paying every contributor.

And a final piece of advice: Wil Wheaton wrote that the exchange he had with the editor wasn’t unpleasant, and that he didn’t blame her for company policy.

Echoing this, it’s always a good idea to be civil to editors no matter how the conversation ends. We’re used to reading about authors and other celebrities who act like divas, but if you develop a reputation for being difficult – especially at the start of your career – word will get around quickly and potentially close off avenues you hadn’t yet explored.

Stay safe, stay sane.

You might know I’m a Municipal Liaison (ML) for National Novel Writing Month in Dundee & Angus, along with a co-ML. The contest is now into its second day.

I’d like to share with you some advice I’ve given members in my region. It’s aimed at protecting your physical and mental health during the contest, so please take a moment to consider these points.

Physical health

50,000 words equates to hundreds of thousands of finger taps. Even if your hands feel fine now, repetitive strain injury can creep up at any time. I’m speaking from my own experience. I therefore urge you to take a few moments to follow the hand stretches and tips on the following websites:

1) http://www.stretchnow.com.au/resources/exercises/hands-exercise
2) http://www.rsiprevention.com/rsi_prevention.php

Also, be sure to stand up from time to time and take a break from the screen. I’m a big fan of the Pomodoro technique, where you work in 25-minute bursts.

Mental health

The message we give to our members is not to feel any undue pressure to reach the target. It’s a tough challenge, but it’s also supposed to be fun. There will be days when you say, I’m writing a load of tosh. There will be days when the day job cuts into your writing time. There will be days when you wonder what the [chuffing heck] you’re doing.

If you need to talk to somebody, get in touch with your ML or another member you trust. Our members can contact us via the NaNoWriMo website or our Facebook page, and we have a mobile number for urgent enquiries.

Continue writing if you can, but don’t let it get on top of you.

What if I don’t complete a novel?

That’s just as much of an achievement. Did you know some of our best-loved stories fall significantly short of this target? A Clockwork Orange and The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie are both novellas, while Brokeback Mountain and It’s a Wonderful Life were adapted from short stories.

So don’t let anyone say you’ve failed, no matter how much or little you’ve written. There is no shame in not reaching 50,000 words.